PLENARY 1: The Diverse Metabolic Actions of FGF21
May
28
8:30 am08:30

PLENARY 1: The Diverse Metabolic Actions of FGF21

Prof. David Mangelsdorf
University of Texas, Southwestern
United States of America

Dr. David J. Mangelsdorf received his B.S. in Biology and Chemistry from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff (1981) and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Arizona in Tucson (1987). He did his postdoctoral studies at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Since 1993 he has been at UT Southwestern, where he currently is Professor and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology, and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He holds the Alfred G. Gilman Distinguished Chair in Pharmacology and the Raymond and Ellen Willie Distinguished Chair in Molecular Neuropharmacology, in Honor of Harold B. Crasilneck, Ph.D. He has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences and The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas since 2008.

Plenary 2: Roles of Pregnancy DHA in Fetal and Neonatal Development
May
28
1:30 pm13:30

Plenary 2: Roles of Pregnancy DHA in Fetal and Neonatal Development

Prof. Susan Carlson
Kansas University Medical Center

United States of America

Susan Carlson, PhD, received her bachelor's in home economics at Washington State University in 1969 and her doctorate in nutrition (minors in biochemistry and physiology) from Iowa State University in 1975. She had NICHD postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Wisconsin in the Dept. of Pathology (1975-1977) and at the University of South Florida in the Dept. of Pediatrics (1978-1979).

A faculty member in several medical school departments of pediatrics, mainly in divisions of newborn medicine from 1979-1997, Carlson rose through the ranks to professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Biochemistry at the University of Tennessee, Memphis. Her major research interest was on the effects of fatty acids that compose a large percent of brain membranes and found in human milk but not in vegetable oils typically used in the production of U.S. infant formulas.

Carlson moved to the University of Missouri Kansas City in 1997 and to the University of Kansas Medical Center in 1999. While at these institutions, she has continued intervention studies of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) supplementation of infants and branched out into studies of DHA- supplemented pregnant women. The latter studies have been done in collaboration with the research team led by John Colombo, PhD, at the University of Kansas through the Maternal and Child Nutrition and Development Laboratory.

Carlson and Colombo have been active in large clinical trials studying infant DHA supplementation and DHA administered to women entering their second trimester of pregnancy. The goal of these trials is to evaluate the effect of DHA provided pre- and postnatally on visual development and behavior of infants, toddlers and, eventually, preschoolers.

Her work having been recognized nationally and internationally, Carlson receives numerous invitations to conferences. In 2002, DHA and AA were added to U.S. infant formulas. In Nov. 2002, she was made an honorary member of the American Dietetic Association in recognition for her pioneering work in identifying DHA as a conditionally essential nutrient for developing infants. Carlson received the 2008 March of Dimes Agnes Higgins Award for outstanding achievement in the field of maternal-fetal nutrition at the American Public Health Association meeting in San Diego, October 2008.

Since 2002, Carlson has taken an active role in the education of U.S. pediatricians, obstetricians, nurses and dietitians about the roles of DHA in maternal and infant health. As part of her role, she has been involved nationally and internationally in evaluating the quality of evidence and establishing best practice guidelines for intake of DHA by infants and pregnant women.